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Three Basic Beginner Medieval Cooking Books For Just Starting Out

It’s not as easy to be confident with medieval recipes as modern cooking. Even English medieval food is a foreign cuisine, translated from a foreign language and calling for strange ingredients. Here’s three great cooking books for those just get starting in medieval cooking.

medievalcookbook

Medieval Cookery by Maggie Black Buy The Book Now at The Book Depository, Free Delivery World Wide

One of the first medieval cookbooks, this book has been simplified for the modern tastebuds and is designed around a very simple shopping centre so it’s easy to get all the ingredients listed. Mostly uses 14th and 15th century english recipes.

 

 

pleyn delightPleyn Delight

Constance Hiatt, Brenda Hosington, Sharon Butler?Buy The Book Now at The Book Depository, Free Delivery World Wide

One of my favourites, this one branches about a bit further with some roman and middle eastern recipes used as well. It has the initial translation of the recipes and then a modern interpretation of that recipe. I’ve found some of these recipes to be a bit simplified compared to the original text but it’s pleasing to modern tastebuds and the recipes do work.

 

9780226706856The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy?by Odile Redon, Fran?oise Sabban, & Silvano Serventi?Buy The Book Now at The Book Depository, Free Delivery World Wide

Medieval Kitchen is a lot more specialised than the other two, focusing on 14th and 15th French and Italian recipes. I personally find the italian recipes to be a little more weird than the French ones, but again, these have been slightly simplified for modern tastebuds and the authors provide good substitutes for when ingredients are harder to find.

 

 

Bonus Recommendation

For some history in cooking and dining, plus a little bit on table manners, I’d recommend Cooking and Dining in Medieval England by Peter Brears. Although it hasn’t got a lot of recipes in it, it’s a great place to get an understanding of how the rooms were set out and how and why they cooked and dined they way they did.

 

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Featured image is from Livre du roi Modus et de la reine Ratio, a 14th century French manuscript, currently located in Bilblioth?que national de France. It depicts a scence of peasants breaking bread together.

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Free Online Resources for Medieval Cooking

While a physical copy of a book is best, sometimes it’s jsut impossible to get your hands on that rare translation.

So here’s a collection of medieval cookbooks online.

Single Books / Translations

 

Forme of Curye

Forme of Curye – Ebook THE 14th century English cookbook.

Menagier de Paris

English translation of Menagier de Paris

I love Menagier de Paris. It’s a story written by an older man for his new young bride. It not only has several very good (and rather plain compared to the fancy dishes often seen) but also talks about basic household stuff – how to remove stains, how to handle the servants, how to tell which fruit is ripe.

 

Collections of Medieval Cookbooks

Medieval Cookery

Medieval Cookery
It’s got several translations of medieval cookbooks with Andalusia, French, Netherlands, Romania, Denmark, Germany, Poland, Russia, England, Italy, Portugal and Spanish texts available (NB: Not everything is translated into English, mostly it’s translated into the modern language)

They also have a statistic page where you can see how many times a food group/item appears in a text to see how common it actually was as an ingredient (for instance with Forme of Currye, fish/seafood is the most common meat at 22% of the 286 receipes while duck is in only 2 or less than 1%), onions are in 15%, salt is in 47% and butter is in just 2%.

Open Hearth Cooking

Open hearth Cooking

3000 vintage Cookbooks

http://www.openculture.com/2016/07/an-archive-of-3000-vintage-cookbooks-lets-you-travel-back-through-culinary-time.html

 

Redactions of Receipes

Roxy’s 20 person lunch – 14th Century
I wrote this document, it’s the receipes I normally use to feed about 20 people for a show event.

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June Newsflash

Greetings Gentle readers,

We had a most enjoyable time at the Blacktown Medieval Fayre, with glorious weather and a lovely venue, we will definitely be attending next year. Meanwhile we are turning our attention to next month?s event at AbbeyStowe in Queensland. Please note; we will continue taking pre-orders only until the 25th of June.

This month will see more reviews of new and classic titles on our Blog and on the website. As well as helpful tips on maintenance of specialty re-enactor pieces, there will also be exciting new items and restocks to peruse With the crisp chill in the air, its time to shake out the woollens and silks and gear up to enjoy the best of living history events of the year.

Until next time, we bid you all ? good reading!
Paul, Elden, Loreena and Roxy.

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Dress Accessories 1150-1450 – Review

Dress Accessories 1150-1450
Geoff Egan
Fran?es Pritchard

Dress Accessories is one of the Museum of London Collections. And like all MoL books, it is faaaaaboulous.

I mean, the text is dry, this is very much an academic book. But for proper details regarding the found artifacts, with proper dates and context for the finds, MoL does it best.

Dress Accessories is about the accessories which people worn upon their persons. It contains finds found in London (and everything is English because it’s Museum of London so no need to worry about, would my persona have this) and this includes
girdles, buckles, strap ends (for belts), mounts, brooches, buttons, lace chapes, hair accessories, pins, beads, chains, pendants, finger rings, bells, purses, cased mirrors, combs, cosmetic sets, and needle cases.

Because it’s an academic text, each illustration of the finds has a scale on the page, which is very handy for anyone who intends to make the items discovered.

buy the book from The Book Depository, free delivery

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Carving Spatchcock and Standing beef roast

Carving animals was an important part of medieval life. At feasts, the animal would be presented to the table, and then taken and carved into bit sized bits. For the most part, a meal could be eaten with just a spoon.

Here are some videos in which Elden is taught to carve a standing rib beef roast and a spatchcock.

Standing Rib Beef Roast
Spatchcock

For more information to learning to carve in a fifteenth century manner, we also have the below pamphlets available.

Book of Carvery Vol 1

Book of Carvery Vol 2

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Featured Product – Carved Lady with Hawke Knife

Carved Lady with Hawke is one of Adam McKay’s finer pieces of work.?Carved in the round, it portrays a young lady with a tame bird of prey. The form is modelled from a popular theme found across Europe and Scandinavia from c. 1200-1400 of young women with birds, dogs and musical instruments. Because extant examples are invariably from ivory, this reproduction is olive wood;?a fine carving wood and fitting substitute.

Beyond the sculpted handle, this is a fully functional carving knife, with a queen ebony bolster and high carbon tool steel blade. High carbon steels take and retain a razor edge, should you decide to put this artwork into service.

The accompanying vegetable tan leather?sheath is a suitable match for the carved handle. It?has been molded directly to the knife, hand stitched and decorated with hand-tooled panels, and finished with a beeswax polish for sheen and durability. The decoration is based on examples in the Museum of London.

More examples of carved handles can be seen at?Gothic Ivories Projects

Carved Lady with Hawke

While this knife is a unique work, Adam can be commissioned for similar knives via Mainly Medieval.

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Back from Rowany Festival AS50, 2016

It was an exciting festival and we’re glad to be home!

This year we tried out a new format and just did a market day at Rowany Festival. It was very busy, some good feedback about things to change for next year but overall a good success!

In May we’ll be going to Gumeracha Medieval Fair (May 8 and 9) so look forward to seeing some people from Adelaide there.

Gumeracha Medieval Fair

(Photo of Medieval Archery Society camp at Rowany Festival AS50 2016 by Andrew Bennett)

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Market Day! March 12th at Precint 75

Mainly Medieval will once again be at the Precinct 75 Markets on March 12th.

Location:
75 Mary St, St Peters.
Time: March 12th. The markets are from 10-3 but we’ll be aiming to be set up by 9:30.
How to get there:
A short walk from Sydenham station or Parking is available via Edith St entrance

The precinct also has delicious coffee, being home to Sample Coffees, so if you’re in the area you should come and grab a coffee and say hi!

We’ll mostly be selling the goods of our artisan The Medieval Stillroom (cosmetics and bath and beauty products such as the beautiful Luxury Balm shown in the featured picture) but it’s our warehouse so all books and re-enactor goods currently in stock will also be there.

Mainly Medieval will only be attending Rowany Festival as a Market Stall this year, not as a permanent merchant so if you want us to bring anything to festival order it now and select the Event Pickup option in the shipping tab.